Here's the Scoop by Brian Sweeney

Brian Sweeney has been the author of “Here’s the Scoop” for more than 20 years. The column usually deals with the lighter side of life and the writer has been known to mix a bit of fiction in with the facts. Brian has received six awards for his column in the annual New York Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest.

Here's the Scoop: September 21, 2011

Catching some porch time
“How was your weekend?” It’s a common pleasantry, designed to take the edge off the back-to-work grind of a Monday morning.

The question, of course, is not meant to probe. It’s more of a greeting.
Grouchy on Mondays by nature, I usually respond that my weekend was lousy. That’s not usually the case, but it makes me feel better about being relegated to an office for the next eight hours. I’m not a confinement kind of guy. Must be my tendency towards claustrophobia.


Here's the Scoop: September 14, 2011

Out of the loop
The passage of time has taken a tiny bit of the sting away following the August 28 flood that created unprecedented destruction in many local communities. With enough distance having passed since the flood, it’s even possible to recall a few lighthearted moments in the events that followed the flooding.


Here's the Scoop: September 7, 2011

Storm clouds still linger
When I awoke last Tuesday, I realized that we were running low on some of the staples in the food department — chips, cheese, seltzer, coffee, bagels. My plans for the day ran through my head, trying to figure out a good time to drop into Freshtown to pick up these items.


Here's the Scoop: August 24, 2011

You can’t wear that!
I guess it’s simply a difficult Situation. Especially if you’re the clothing company Abercrombie & Fitch (A&F).

The news broke last week that A&F has offered to pay Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino to not wear its clothing on the “hit” show “Jersey Shore.” In a day when “product placement” is so highly sought after, this is a very unusual move indeed.


Here's the Scoop: August 17, 2011

Mob mentality
I have a theory that once I become aware of a trend, it’s time for the trend to be over.
This rule of thumb usually works pretty well, especially since I’m sort of slow to realize that a trend has even occurred. So, by the time I figure out such things, the trend should be well past its prime.