The pie is getting bigger

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To The Editor:
 Waking up to the Big Lie by John Cerullo (mailbox 3/20) states that we can solve our fiscal woes by taxing the rich and big corporations.  He doesn’t define what constitutes the rich, apparently believing all the rich are Scrooge McDucks swimming in pools of gold.

He forgets that the rich got rich by risking their own capital and creating products or services that consumers want.  They cannot tax their neighbor.  He also forgets that corporations are owned by stockholders.  The working people’s pension plans and IRAs are invested in these stocks.
We live in a competitive world.  Businesses seek out environments most favorable to them.  High taxes are unfavorable, businesses relocate, jobs are lost: see California, it’s bankrupt; better yet, look at Detroit, which has been under Democratic control for 50 years.

Now let’s look at one absolute blatant fact.  The more money government gets, the more it spends.
They redistribute this money meaning they first spend it on pet projects like bridges to nowhere, tunnels for turtles, ad infinitum.  They “invest in the future’ based on wishful thinking rather than reality: see Solyndra, Bright Source, LSP Energy, etc.  The government has a track record of bankrupting every single entity they get involved with: Salle Mae, Fannie Mae, Social Security, Post Office, Medicare, etc.  The government can lose money because it’s ours.  Politicians need headlines, businessmen need profits.

Finally, his whole article seems to be predicated on the belief that the economy is based on one big pie.  He forgets that successful businesses create a bigger pie.  The gross domestic product is all the goods and services created by businessmen.  Remember, the government doesn’t create anything. 

The free entrepreneurial system creates everything based on what the people want.  If Plattekill Mountain runs a great operation, and I believe they do, they bring people into the area.  These people stay at our lodges, shop in our stores, and eat at our restaurants.  The pie grows bigger and the money is naturally distributed in the manner the individual wants to spend his money, not the way government dictates. The answer isn’t raising taxes, which makes business more difficult and expensive and thus reduces jobs.  It’s getting big government off our backs, and this is precisely what the ugly, radical right you refer to is attempting to do.
 
Bruce Brenner,
Roxbury