August 26, 2009: Human beings are the problem

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To The Editor:
In last week’s mailbag Ed Kirstein took exception to my use of the adjective fanatic to characterize those who promote global warming as an unchallenged scientific fact. I stated I thought, quite plainly, that I make no judgment of their thesis as to whether it was right or wrong.
One definition of “fanatic” is “Marked by excessive enthusiasm for and intense devotion to a cause or idea” and it is not necessarily a pejorative. There the matter should rest, but then he proceeds to state the demonstrable false “most respected scientists agree that the planet is warming and the evidence proves it.”
Most scientists do not agree. Hundreds have challenged the myth that there is a consensus in the scientific community. They site for example, over 60 glacial advances and retreats have occurred during the last two million years. During each of these intervals many glacial advances and retreats occurred. Our modern climate represents a very short, warm period between glacial advances. If this is true then there must also have been 60 global warmings in that same period of time without gas guzzling motor vehicles or belching smoke stacks polluting the atmosphere.
But for those who subscribe to the “Co2 is the culprit” scenario there is this, China and India with their over three billion people put into the air more Co2 daily, than all our gasoline vehicles, simply by breathing. Be that as it may, the point I raise is world population and the effect it has on stabilizing this planet is a greater threat than “global warming.”
To date food supply has kept up to population growth but there is real trouble down the line. With all the growth in population the agriculture community has had to increase their production to meet the need of the world’s people. Food is life and life provides food. That’s the equilibrium. There is no way around it. Starvation, of one form or the other, is the natural governing mechanism. If nature is left to solve the problem, an equilibrium will be established on this planet, whether we like it or not, or whether humans are still around or not.
We humans are the problem. More people than before means that the energy and food supply is no longer sufficient. Starvation is nature’s way of letting a form of life know that they reproduced beyond a certain degree. It is a control mechanism, like disease, and is a part of life itself. Nature will relegate us to the dust bin of history where, if we do not change, we justly belong.

Stuart E. Buswell,
Margaretville