Mailbag

Their work is cut out for them

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To The Editor:
Last week’s article, “Village Rips DEP Buyout Plans”, deserves your attention. The article never talks about the real issue, but it is the story of the Village of Margaretville losing a financial power struggle with the community. The article concentrates on convincing the pub­lic a serious mistake has been made. It is the story about the village losing control of who can and cannot participate in a buyout.


Why continue the Watershed Agreement?

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To The Editor:
The article in the February 4 issue about the Margaretville Village Board’s travails with DEP may present the need to confront a larger issue. Has the time come to end the Watershed MOA and Filtration Avoidance Waiver that goes with it? Both were signed in 1998. Back then, there were concerns that filtration on the scale New York City would need could be unworkable. Costs were uncertain, with estimates as high as $11 billion. This was a time when city finances were in dreadful condition, so the city couldn’t borrow, bond, or otherwise fund such a project. The agreement as signed offered financial benefits to both a beleaguered city and the watershed towns that host the water consumed by New York City.
Now, the city is thriving and its finances are sound.


Let me decide what I'm eating

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To The Editor:
As a health conscience mom, I tried to feed my kids right. Now, a grandma, a deeper concern has come into my life. It is Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) foods. I have learned that GMO foods are not the foods we ate as kids. They were developed in 1972.  A GMO food is genetically changed from anything that nature could create.


Leadership changed needed

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To The Editor:
On January 24 I attended the annual Schoharie Water Quality Summit. The focus this year was on community action for flood mitigation and economic recovery after the recent flood events. Representatives from Prattsville, Sidney, and Walton talked about the programs in progress in each village. Each had a story of a major setback, a struggle to bring the community together, the slow development of plans to a way forward, how to pay for the work, and now the beginning of progress on the ground.


Reflections on the resort public hearing

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To The Editor:
Last Monday night, January 6 (and I pray to God) the final public hearing for the Crossroads project was held at Shandaken Town Hall.
Six of the seven Planning Board members presided over the meeting accompanied by their secretary, a stenographer (who arrived late), and the board’s lawyer. The tone was serious and official. The public was limited to three-minute statements and urged to keep it civil with a warning that speakers may be ordered to leave after making their comments if space became an issue. It didn’t.


Why all the flood damage?

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To The Editor:
Thank you for last week’s article about the NY Rising Margaretville Bull Run project.
A key part of the NY Rising program is “that the projects be community driven.” The community needs to know about the projects and to have their questions and concerns addressed when there are major discrepancies between what is proposed and community expectations.


RCS capital improvements are needed

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To the Editor:
As a former full-time resident and now a second homeowner lucky enough to still be employed in our neck of the woods, I wanted to send a brief shout out to support the capital project coming up for a vote on January 6 for Roxbury Central School.


Looks like sneaky politics

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To The Editor:
Looks like sneaky politics are not confined to Washington and Albany.  
The outcry against the capital project slated for Roxbury Central School has reached the ears of the powers that be. Apparently, for fear of a vote rejecting the project to raise monies to build more unneeded underutilized school, the vote is scheduled 11 days from notice of the vote.
Trying to slide approval through without the consent of the populace is beyond contempt. They should be ashamed.  

Marty Lieberman, Halcottsville


Stop the increasing costs

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To The Editor:
Responding to Diana Manson’s letter to the editor in the December 10th issue of the News, I believe we all want the best education for our children. I believe our educators in our communities, Margaretville and Roxbury, are striving to provide our children with excellence in education.  I don’t believe that is the underlining issue.


Your help is truly needed

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To The Editor:
Each year, our Community Christmas Project reaches out to brighten Christmas for many area residents. Last year, food baskets were delivered to 143 families, affecting 423 of your friends, relatives, and neighbors. Homemade breads were delivered to people who were recently bereaved. Margaretville Central School elementary children made cards that were mailed with gift certificates to area residents who live alone. Toys, mittens, and other gifts were wrapped and given to 247 children.


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