In This Place: Stories from the News Archives by Trish Adams

In This Place: January 14, 2015

From January 27, 1950. The opening paragraph read: “The dedication and official opening of the Belleayre Mountain ski slope Saturday afternoon was the greatest day the Cats­kills have known since the Ulster & Delaware railroad ran its first train to Pine Hill nearly a century ago.”From January 27, 1950. The opening paragraph read: “The dedication and official opening of the Belleayre Mountain ski slope Saturday afternoon was the greatest day the Cats­kills have known since the Ulster & Delaware railroad ran its first train to Pine Hill nearly a century ago.”
First Tracks

I knew I wanted this week’s column to be about the early days of Belleayre and possibly ski patrol but then I stumbled on the Woodward and Bernstein of ski report­ing: Frank Elkins. Although a Long Islander, Elkins spent plenty of ink promoting skiing in our area. So I leave a large part of this column to his portrait of the new ski area just as it was entering the 60s.


In This Place: January 7, 2015

Happy New Year — Some “Firsts” on the “Fives”

This first column of the year is dedicated to beginnings and fresh starts. I scouted for happy news in the first issues of years ending in five, although 1925 was missing, and I felt it was inappropriate to cheat on that year.
Let’s start with an old-fashioned skimelton in Roxbury. Some of the type in this item was cut off, so I don’t know if the “skimeltoners” were young men or young people of both genders. Too bad none of them is still here to ask!


In This Place: Dec. 31, 2014

Going, Going, Gone
This ad, and the one below, both come from the Dec. 29, 1944 edition, when the war in Europe had been won but Allies still fought the Japanese in the Pacific.This ad, and the one below, both come from the Dec. 29, 1944 edition, when the war in Europe had been won but Allies still fought the Japanese in the Pacific.


In This Place: Dec. 24, 2014

Here Comes Santa Claus
From December 23, 1938From December 23, 1938


In This Place: December 10, 2014

The Christmas Sacrifice

December 1941 turned from Jingle Bells and Deck the Halls to war bonds and sending young men to the front in one fell swoop (literally) when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7. It is still amazing how quickly the country mobilized, in every possible way. Less than a week after the US declared war on Japan and Germany, in the issue of December 12, 1941, you could already read about everything from quelling rumors to how to prepare for a blackout.
From the December 25, 1941 editionFrom the December 25, 1941 edition


In This Place: December 3, 2014

Curing What Ails You

In honor of World AIDS Day (December 1), I thought we would look back at other epidemics and how people faced them decades ago. I figured the Spanish Influenza pandemic of 1918 — probably the most deadly in recorded history — would afford me an entire column; however, it seems that flu was never as rampant in our mountain towns as it was in the cities, and most of the News coverage was simply an attempt to keep people calm.
Another disease which struck terror especially in the hearts of mothers, was infantile paralysis, or polio, which mostly hit infants and small children but could afflict adults too. Here too, it seems the dread illness was not rampant here, although its effect on the nation as a whole was widely recognized and feared.
GETTING READY FOR THE BIGGEST BIRTHDAY PARTY IN AMERICAN HISTORY
Every community in the nation will honor President Roosevelt when he becomes 52 years old on Tuesday, Jan. 30 by giving a local ball to help endow an extension of the nation-wide work of the Warm Springs Foundation for Infantile Paralysis in which the President is so deeply interested. Upper left, the President and his mother. Mrs. James A. Roosevelt, who bought the first box sold for the New York ball in the Waldorf-Astoria, upper center. Colonel Henry L. Doherty, chairman of the committee of leaders arranging the observance of the President's anniversary; upper right, the official poster contributed to the movement by the famous artist, Howard Chandler Christy; lower picture, child patients at Warm Springs sharpening up knives and appetites for the largest observance of the President's birthday ever held at that health center. Tha cake, weighing 344 pounds and said to be the larger; birthday cake ever made, was presented to the children for their party by Chairman Doherty.  From the Jan. 26, 1934 editionGETTING READY FOR THE BIGGEST BIRTHDAY PARTY IN AMERICAN HISTORY
Every community in the nation will honor President Roosevelt when he becomes 52 years old on Tuesday, Jan. 30 by giving a local ball to help endow an extension of the nation-wide work of the Warm Springs Foundation for Infantile Paralysis in which the President is so deeply interested. Upper left, the President and his mother. Mrs. James A. Roosevelt, who bought the first box sold for the New York ball in the Waldorf-Astoria, upper center. Colonel Henry L. Doherty, chairman of the committee of leaders arranging the observance of the President's anniversary; upper right, the official poster contributed to the movement by the famous artist, Howard Chandler Christy; lower picture, child patients at Warm Springs sharpening up knives and appetites for the largest observance of the President's birthday ever held at that health center. Tha cake, weighing 344 pounds and said to be the larger; birthday cake ever made, was presented to the children for their party by Chairman Doherty. From the Jan. 26, 1934 edition


In This Place: Nov. 26, 2014

Gobble, Gobble

This Thanksgiving column is so stuffed it leaves little room for commentary! Here’s some sticker shock from the first post-WWI Thanksgiving:

November 29, 1918 — Dear Turkey
Thanksgiving Dinner Costs $1 More This Year Than Last—$3 More Than in 1913.
Thanksgiving dinner for five persons, with an eight pound turkey, cost $1 more this year than it did last and $2.92 more than in 1913. These figures were complied by the Federal Food board and are based on what it considers “fair prices.”


In This Place: Nov. 19, 2014

Gone Huntin’

It’s the season when a young man goes seeking his first buck and our pages are adorned with their trophies. Hunting tales abound in our archives too, I hope you enjoy the ones I’ve culled for you this year — as with the deer, there are plenty that got away that we can scare up next year!


In This Place: Nov. 12, 2014

End of Hostilities

In honor of Veterans Day, I thought we could take a happy glance back to those days when the end of a war was announced. The holiday itself was first known as Armistice Day, to honor the day that World War I (the war “to end all wars”) ended. These first few items all appeared on the
November 15, 1918 front page.

Celebrated News of Peace with Great Spirit
Margaretville made noise all day and part of the night.
Kaiser Hung From A Wire And Burned
Many people said the day was the happiest they ever knew.
Margaretville celebrated the news of peace Monday with a vengeance.
The false peace alarm of last Thursday got a foothold here but when it was found to be a fake the celebration stopped. The deserted Sweeney house on upper Main Street was burned that night at about 8 o’clock. No one knows how it got afire.


In This Place: November 5, 2014

Did You Vote?
Call me a sicko, but I love politics. I worked on the 1990 campaign of Deborah Glick, the first openly gay person ever elect­ed to the NYS Assembly. Some News readers may remember my coverage of the 2006 race of Congresswoman Kirsten Gillibrand, now our Senator.
I also love the math, science and strategy of it all. So, now that Nov. 4 has come and gone, let’s enjoy some very pre-Nate Silver election results.

November 5, 1909 — Close Vote Delays the Final Count
The recent election was probably the closest one in the history of the county, there being only a matter of about 100 votes between victory and defeat.
The result could not be author­itively announced until the official returns had been canvassed at Delhi Wednesday evening.


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